Study Shows Direct Mail is a More Important Driver to Online Giving than Online Communications

27-10-2010

More than twice as many online donors say they were prompted to give an online gift in response to a direct mail appeal compared to when they received an e-appeal, according to a national Dunham+Company study recently conducted by research firm Campbell Rinker. 

More than twice as many online donors say they were prompted to give an online gift in response to a direct mail appeal compared to when they received an e-appeal, according to a national Dunham+Company study recently conducted by research firm Campbell Rinker. In a surprising finding, 14 percent said that a direct mail letter prompted them to give online versus only 6 percent who said an email prompted their online gift.

Further underlining the importance of direct mail to motivate online giving, 1 in 3 donors (37 percent) who give online say that when they receive a direct mail appeal from a charity they use the charity's website to give their donation.

The younger the donor, the more likely they are to use a charity's website to respond to a direct mail appeal. One in two (50 percent) of generation X or Y donors say they give online in response to a direct mail appeal with 1 in 4 (26 percent) of boomers turning to online giving when they want to give as a result of receiving a direct mail appeal. Only 14 percent of those over 65 will do the same, as 3 out of 4 of this demographic prefer to give by mail.

The study was conducted among respondents who were invited to participate in an online research panel and who qualified to participate due to recent self-reported giving. 

In addition, the study found that the higher the household income, the more likely the direct mail recipient was to donate online. Nearly half (46 percent) of households making $75k+ said they would donate online compared to 37 percent of households making $25k-$74k and about one-third (32 percent) of households which make less than $25k.

For full article at AFP website click here.